Heart Failure sub-study (MDCC-HF)

Información en Español

Monitoring Disparities in Chronic Conditions – Heart Failure sub-study (MDCC-HF)

You have been asked to participate in the Monitoring Disparities in Chronic Conditions – Heart Failure sub-study (MDCC-HF), a health research study focusing on heart failure. This is an important part of a larger study called the Monitoring Disparities in Chronic Conditions (MDCC) Study being conducted by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington in partnership with Public Health – Seattle & King County, the county health department.

Heart failure affects some communities more than others, depending on race, ethnicity, and geography. Not all communities receive the same treatment for heart failure.

Our study, called MDCC-HF, is looking at the way treatment is delivered to people with heart failure in King County, Washington. We are interested in what heart failure medications are being prescribed for and taken by people in King County, and whether these medications end up reaching the people who need them most. We are also interested in how differences in DNA (our genetics) influence the way these medications are processed by our bodies. This will help us to better understand health disparities in diseases, access to health care services, and use of health treatments among different groups by providing information about health and health care within a broad range of communities in our county. 

If you participate, we will ask you about your medications and symptoms related to heart disease. We will draw blood from you only once (unless you already had a blood draw during the MDCC Study physical exam). We can visit you at home for the blood draw, or you can come to the University of Washington Medical Center. We will measure blood biomarkers and genes that influence how your body handles heart medication.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why was I asked to participate?

Individuals already enrolled in the MDCC Study are asked to participate if they report having heart failure or have visited a hospital or clinic that diagnosed them with heart failure.

What does the study involve?

If you participate, we will ask you about your medications and symptoms related to heart disease. We will draw blood from you only once (unless you already had a blood draw for the MDCC Study). We will measure blood biomarkers and genes that influence how your body handles heart medicine.

You have arranged to draw my blood. Should I take my medications on the day of that visit?

You should take your medications as you normally would.

What will be done with my personal information?

All of the information you provide will be confidential. We will use a unique study identification number to code all of the information you give to us. We will keep the link between participant names and study identification numbers in a secured location until Dec. 31, 2014, after which we will destroy any information that could link participant names to the coded information. Anonymous study data will be kept indefinitely. If we publish the results of this study, we will not use your name. 

Are there any risks?

The risks to this study include invasion of privacy and breach of confidentiality. We work hard to maintain your privacy. You are free to decline to answer any questions. Some people do not want genetic tests.  If you feel this way and are selected to participate in the MDCC – Heart Failure sub-study, you are free to decline genetic testing.

Potential risks associated with the blood draw include discomfort as a result of the needle stick, possible bruising or infection at the site where blood is taken, and, in rare instances, fainting.

All blood draws will be performed by trained technicians, which will minimize these risks.

Who do I contact if I have any questions regarding the heart failure specific blood draw?

You may contact the study coordinator at 1-206-356-0240.

Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
2301 Fifth Ave., Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98121, USA
Tel: +1.206.897.2800 Fax: +1.206.897.2899
© 2014 University of Washington